Testimonials

“Joining the Mets in mid-season, Skip quickly became You feel thousands of eyes burning your jersey as they wait for a pitch. You gulp at the air trying to settle your nerves. It’s go time. the dependable ‘closer’ we needed. He and I had long conversations about exactly how to prepare for each game and what it meant to leave nothing to chance. In his new book he takes you with us, onto the field and into the action.” —Tom Seaver, MLB Hall of Fame, friend and teammate; author, The Art of Pitching

“The mid and late 1970s are hardly remembered as the best of times for the New York Mets, but that’s not Skip Lockwood’s fault. Lost in the midst of mediocrity was some truly fine work out of the bullpen by a man who was as introspective and observant as any player of his generation. Armed with a keen sense of humor and self-deprecation, Skip’s memoir, Insight Pitch provides a unique look at life in the major leagues before the players enjoyed the riches and security of today’s big leaguers.” —Howie Rose, Broadcaster, New York Mets, WOR Radio 710 AM, New York

“From throwing a ball against the wall in his home as a young boy to the major leagues, Skip takes us on a remarkable journey inside the mindset of a professional athlete.  He really knocks it out of the park.  This book is a must read for any boy or girl and a valuable tool for coaches interested in all levels of sports.” – Dr. Harvey Dulberg, Sports Psychotherapist

“The stories Skip shares in Insight Pitch of his major league career are sprinkled with humor and sensitivity. He shares with us his feelings and emotions when facing hitters in tough situations. This is a terrific book.” — Rico Petrocelli, Red Sox Hall of Famer

“Skip Lockwood writes he might have been the ‘most ill-equipped person’ to ever don a major league uniform, yet few seem better suited to tell the story of a baseball life. Skip’s glasses may have fogged up on the mound, but his perspective on the challenges, rewards, and realities of the game as it was truly played couldn’t be more cleareyed.” —Greg Prince, Faith and Fear in Flushing